A book review as a meal: A Single Man by Christopher Isherwood

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George, the protagonist, is adjusting to life on his own after the sudden death of his partner, determined to persist in the routines of his daily life. An Englishman and a professor living in suburban Southern California, he is an outsider in every way, and his internal reflections and interactions with others reveal a man who loves being alive despite everyday injustices and loneliness. Wry, suddenly manic, constantly funny, surprisingly sad, this novel catches the true textures of life itself.

A small meal but a full meal. An array of flavors but all cohesive and satisfactory circular. A firm patty, tough yet tender, buttery crumb. Pickles and mayo. Hand whisked, hand sliced, hand salted. Right after your carnivorous heart. Splash o’ intoxicant. Beauty and insecurity. Quite devastating in the end but only for the question, what if, what if there was more? All the more gustatory pleasures, that mouthfeel of balanced richness and common ground, those swirls dispersed in between that spoke of faraway things here contained. (Almost like (dark)chocolate in a burger.) Oh just what if! But that meal, it was there. Are you ravished or are you famished?

What do you think?
Beez.

The truth about keeping secrets is just another Young Adult book. By Savannah Brown. Claps.

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Sydney’s dad is the only psychiatrist for miles around their small Ohio town.
He is also unexpectedly dead.
Is Sydney crazy, or is it kind of weird that her dad-a guy whose entire job revolved around other peoples’ secrets-crashed alone, with no explanation?
And why is June Copeland, homecoming queen and the town’s golden child, at his funeral?
As the two girls grow closer in the wake of the accident, it’s clear that not everyone is happy about their new friendship.
But what is picture perfect June still hiding? And does Sydney even want to know?
THE TRUTH ABOUT KEEPING SECRETS is a page-turning, voice led, high school thriller.

This is: Just another YA book. Complete with script and absent parent and angsty child voice. Maybe a little better than many. With this skirted off mystery on the top. A poor rendition into grief and death. With a smacking coping mechanism to go with. A strange half-present friendship. And an unfulfilled heart. Another friendship. The one from that John Green book. Overall nothing really special. Or new. Just your typical. YA book

All of this is to say that. I hate genre publishing. And that fiction should be a cause for digging into something. Not to tie the strings and resolve a long chapter. And I like deeper contemplation. And that this is this authors’ debut. And she’s hardly 20. Which means she’s allowed. All the tropes and tribulations. All the better if she gets to make the sweet dough for life through it. Even better if it appeals to other people. I just hope the industry makes spaces for spillings.

This is also to say. That I hate myself the most. But the review wouldn’t come out any other way. Take my lackluster apology.

Beez

(Does anybody reading this care about this blog? Should we just shut it?)

A convenient inconvenience?: Convenience Store Woman by Sayaka Murata

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Keiko Furukura had always been considered a strange child, and her parents always worried how she would get on in the real world, so when she takes on a job in a convenience store while at university, they are delighted for her. For her part, in the convenience store she finds a predictable world mandated by the store manual, which dictates how the workers should act and what they should say, and she copies her coworkers’ style of dress and speech patterns so that she can play the part of a normal person. However, eighteen years later, at age 36, she is still in the same job, has never had a boyfriend, and has only few friends. She feels comfortable in her life, but is aware that she is not living up to society’s expectations and causing her family to worry about her. When a similarly alienated but cynical and bitter young man comes to work in the store, he will upset Keiko’s contented stasis—but will it be for the better?

That blurb! I’d like to know the amount of people it fooled into believing that this book is a quirky romance. I know it did me! It’s fine though, because it’s infinitely better than any romance could be.

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A Vicious review(?) for Vicious by V. E. Schwab

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So, Schwab…
Boy! does she come with the hype.

She’s okay.

Nothing more, nothing less, not astounding, not even great. Vicious is just fine (mediocre fine, not fine as in fine ass specimen fine). It’s a light, simple, easy fantasy that sacrifices a possible deeper level to be the commercial-friendly semi suspenseful thriller that it is. You can probably predict the end fairly easily. NOthing new.

It started out smashingly well, I have to say. I loved the dichotomy and dynamic of the slightly erratic and mysterious Eli and the jealous Victor. I love writing that explores jealousy instead of directly villainizing or dehumanizing it. (Give me more please). The chopped-up timeline worked to a tee and it gave off the whiff of the future antagonism in the past parts, while also keeping it fluid and grey. That was fun. Eli and Victor are also pre-med students and I like science so that was alSO fun.
And then the story progressed. Ie, became the fantasy that you’ve read/watched/know endless times before, has little to no depth and is over-the-top easy storytelling.

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An Absolutely UNremarkable thing by W(h)ank Green

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This book will only get good reviews.

Not because of the book oH no! It’s because Hank Green,- the entire vlog brothers enterprise – are Great Advertisers.

L00k at the title! It’s BAIT for their baby minions to write in their squeal reviews that An absolutely remarkable thing is An absolutely remarkable thing. They love being told what to think. And you don’t get better than the Vlogbrothers at it.

#i have not read it #don’t think i intend to #it’s going to be such a self important book #why is this my second youtuber book rev in a row hang me

Secrets for the Mad by Dodie Clark [YouTube is actually a wannabe writers detour]

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a youtuber book

I mean, I picked it up so blame me.

I believe in principle that YouTubers should not write memoirs and self-help books unless they’re an in-depth one on YouTube specifically. But that’s not how the world works is it? This world works on a if-it-cashes-in basis.

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Please make me read these 10 books before (I die) 2018

Hello people! I come to you today, trying to make some sense of my ridiculously numbered (over 1100) TBR on Goodreads. God help me.

*sounds of perpetual screaming*

I know a lot of us have the problem of excessively adding to our TBR but believe me mine is worse. 1100(+) + the books I keep buying for some reason. And I hardly ever read physical books! (I read on eBook, maybe will do a post on that?) Yet, books are the only thing my mind justifies buying (with my money, other peoples money is for other trash). I’m not sure if my brain knows logic.

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We were liars by E. Lockhart [so am I]

(So so so sorry for the big absence we do other stuff sometimes? You can leave a Howler below.)

What started out as an easy and interesting read turned into the last chapter of shock.

We were liars, is about what goes on behind the scenes in the house of the Sinclair family.

Particularly, Cady.

The story is about four cousins who get together every summer and hence call themselves the liars.

And then there’s an accident.

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Twisted minds: Eileen by Ottessa Moshfegh

Eileen is the debutante novel by Ottessa Moshfegh, about the titular character Eileen, an outsider, a lonesome woman in the 1960’s living in a gloomy town in New England, a self-obsessed woman working as a secretary in a young boy’s juvenile correctional facility. The book follows Eileen a week before a looming life-altering incident through Eileen’s thoughts, her obsessions, behavior, her routine, and her relationship with her old alcoholic father, her fantasies regarding a handsome guard at work and towards the end, her obsession and friendship with the new and beautiful Rebecca, also from work.

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The princess saves herself in this one – Amanda Lovelace

Since this lovely book was in verse (poetry), I decided to bite it and have the review in verse too. Judge all you like.

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Pick this up
if
1. You are a girl
2. You are broken
3. You are in need
of some friction to light that spark in you.

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