The truth about keeping secrets is just another Young Adult book. By Savannah Brown. Claps.

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Sydney’s dad is the only psychiatrist for miles around their small Ohio town.
He is also unexpectedly dead.
Is Sydney crazy, or is it kind of weird that her dad-a guy whose entire job revolved around other peoples’ secrets-crashed alone, with no explanation?
And why is June Copeland, homecoming queen and the town’s golden child, at his funeral?
As the two girls grow closer in the wake of the accident, it’s clear that not everyone is happy about their new friendship.
But what is picture perfect June still hiding? And does Sydney even want to know?
THE TRUTH ABOUT KEEPING SECRETS is a page-turning, voice led, high school thriller.

This is: Just another YA book. Complete with script and absent parent and angsty child voice. Maybe a little better than many. With this skirted off mystery on the top. A poor rendition into grief and death. With a smacking coping mechanism to go with. A strange half-present friendship. And an unfulfilled heart. Another friendship. The one from that John Green book. Overall nothing really special. Or new. Just your typical. YA book

All of this is to say that. I hate genre publishing. And that fiction should be a cause for digging into something. Not to tie the strings and resolve a long chapter. And I like deeper contemplation. And that this is this authors’ debut. And she’s hardly 20. Which means she’s allowed. All the tropes and tribulations. All the better if she gets to make the sweet dough for life through it. Even better if it appeals to other people. I just hope the industry makes spaces for spillings.

This is also to say. That I hate myself the most. But the review wouldn’t come out any other way. Take my lackluster apology.

Beez

(Does anybody reading this care about this blog? Should we just shut it?)

A convenient inconvenience?: Convenience Store Woman by Sayaka Murata

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Keiko Furukura had always been considered a strange child, and her parents always worried how she would get on in the real world, so when she takes on a job in a convenience store while at university, they are delighted for her. For her part, in the convenience store she finds a predictable world mandated by the store manual, which dictates how the workers should act and what they should say, and she copies her coworkers’ style of dress and speech patterns so that she can play the part of a normal person. However, eighteen years later, at age 36, she is still in the same job, has never had a boyfriend, and has only few friends. She feels comfortable in her life, but is aware that she is not living up to society’s expectations and causing her family to worry about her. When a similarly alienated but cynical and bitter young man comes to work in the store, he will upset Keiko’s contented stasis—but will it be for the better?

That blurb! I’d like to know the amount of people it fooled into believing that this book is a quirky romance. I know it did me! It’s fine though, because it’s infinitely better than any romance could be.

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A Vicious review(?) for Vicious by V. E. Schwab

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So, Schwab…
Boy! does she come with the hype.

She’s okay.

Nothing more, nothing less, not astounding, not even great. Vicious is just fine (mediocre fine, not fine as in fine ass specimen fine). It’s a light, simple, easy fantasy that sacrifices a possible deeper level to be the commercial-friendly semi suspenseful thriller that it is. You can probably predict the end fairly easily. NOthing new.

It started out smashingly well, I have to say. I loved the dichotomy and dynamic of the slightly erratic and mysterious Eli and the jealous Victor. I love writing that explores jealousy instead of directly villainizing or dehumanizing it. (Give me more please). The chopped-up timeline worked to a tee and it gave off the whiff of the future antagonism in the past parts, while also keeping it fluid and grey. That was fun. Eli and Victor are also pre-med students and I like science so that was alSO fun.
And then the story progressed. Ie, became the fantasy that you’ve read/watched/know endless times before, has little to no depth and is over-the-top easy storytelling.

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Seven Surrenders by Ada Palmer [A sequel where shit hits the fan]

Seven Surrenders

It’s absolutely impossible for me to talk about the plot of this book without giving away major spoilers of the first book (review here) AND this book. So in an attempt to keep this review SPOILER FREE, I’ll try to be as vague as possible.

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Endless Night by Agatha Christie [The ending had me shook]

I have read very few Agatha Christie novels. This being the third one. So far, my rating of her novels has been ranging from 2-3 stars but this one was a 3.5.

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In Endless Night we follow the character named Michael Rogers. In want of better life, he’s been doing odd jobs all his life. But an accidental meet-up with an heiress ends up changing his entire life around. He marries her and builds the perfect home for the two of them.

Unfortunately for him, the land his home is built on is cursed and it all goes downhill soon enough.

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Review of The Seventh Sentinel by Yolanda Ramos

Before we begin my review, here’s a little something about the book:

23153268Moments before the destruction of Jerusalem in 70 A.D., the seven Archangels remove powerful, ancient artefacts from the Jewish temple. These are given into the safekeeping of seven men. Throughout the ages, these men and their descendants become known as the Seven Sentinels.

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Spider’s Web: A play by Agatha Christie, novelized by Charles Osborne

If you’re like me a.k.a you’ve hardly read many Agatha Christie novels then it might come as a surprise to you that she used to write plays… and romance novels under a pseudonym, but I’m not interested in that.

Alibi was the first play to reach the stage. It was an adaptation of The Murder of Roger Ackroyd but it wasn’t written by her and she didn’t like it either. The first play that was written by her and staged was Black Coffee. She has a written a total of 19 plays, adding to her impressive list of 82 detective novels.

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Retrograde by Peter Cawdron [The Best Sci-fi book I’ve read this year]

Retrograde’s blurb caught my attention quicker than cake and that’s saying something. It’s about a colony of humans from all walks of Earth settling on Mars for research. But how will things turn out when nuclear war devastates everyone back home?

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A Gathering of Shadows by V.E.Schwab [A beautiful sequel but a little lacking]

I’m a huge fan of V.E.Schwab even though I’ve only read the first book of this series. The review of which you can find here. Nevertheless, this review is definitely SPOILER FREE!

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Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie [Soon to be released as a movie]

I read this book a while ago but considering how a movie will be based on it soon, I thought it was high time that I post my review on it.

“The murderer is with us – on the train now…”

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