A book review as a meal: A Single Man by Christopher Isherwood

7599372

George, the protagonist, is adjusting to life on his own after the sudden death of his partner, determined to persist in the routines of his daily life. An Englishman and a professor living in suburban Southern California, he is an outsider in every way, and his internal reflections and interactions with others reveal a man who loves being alive despite everyday injustices and loneliness. Wry, suddenly manic, constantly funny, surprisingly sad, this novel catches the true textures of life itself.

A small meal but a full meal. An array of flavors but all cohesive and satisfactory circular. A firm patty, tough yet tender, buttery crumb. Pickles and mayo. Hand whisked, hand sliced, hand salted. Right after your carnivorous heart. Splash o’ intoxicant. Beauty and insecurity. Quite devastating in the end but only for the question, what if, what if there was more? All the more gustatory pleasures, that mouthfeel of balanced richness and common ground, those swirls dispersed in between that spoke of faraway things here contained. (Almost like (dark)chocolate in a burger.) Oh just what if! But that meal, it was there. Are you ravished or are you famished?

What do you think?
Beez.

The truth about keeping secrets is just another Young Adult book. By Savannah Brown. Claps.

dxw-2b3wkaau9um

Sydney’s dad is the only psychiatrist for miles around their small Ohio town.
He is also unexpectedly dead.
Is Sydney crazy, or is it kind of weird that her dad-a guy whose entire job revolved around other peoples’ secrets-crashed alone, with no explanation?
And why is June Copeland, homecoming queen and the town’s golden child, at his funeral?
As the two girls grow closer in the wake of the accident, it’s clear that not everyone is happy about their new friendship.
But what is picture perfect June still hiding? And does Sydney even want to know?
THE TRUTH ABOUT KEEPING SECRETS is a page-turning, voice led, high school thriller.

This is: Just another YA book. Complete with script and absent parent and angsty child voice. Maybe a little better than many. With this skirted off mystery on the top. A poor rendition into grief and death. With a smacking coping mechanism to go with. A strange half-present friendship. And an unfulfilled heart. Another friendship. The one from that John Green book. Overall nothing really special. Or new. Just your typical. YA book

All of this is to say that. I hate genre publishing. And that fiction should be a cause for digging into something. Not to tie the strings and resolve a long chapter. And I like deeper contemplation. And that this is this authors’ debut. And she’s hardly 20. Which means she’s allowed. All the tropes and tribulations. All the better if she gets to make the sweet dough for life through it. Even better if it appeals to other people. I just hope the industry makes spaces for spillings.

This is also to say. That I hate myself the most. But the review wouldn’t come out any other way. Take my lackluster apology.

Beez

(Does anybody reading this care about this blog? Should we just shut it?)

A convenient inconvenience?: Convenience Store Woman by Sayaka Murata

img_9871

Keiko Furukura had always been considered a strange child, and her parents always worried how she would get on in the real world, so when she takes on a job in a convenience store while at university, they are delighted for her. For her part, in the convenience store she finds a predictable world mandated by the store manual, which dictates how the workers should act and what they should say, and she copies her coworkers’ style of dress and speech patterns so that she can play the part of a normal person. However, eighteen years later, at age 36, she is still in the same job, has never had a boyfriend, and has only few friends. She feels comfortable in her life, but is aware that she is not living up to society’s expectations and causing her family to worry about her. When a similarly alienated but cynical and bitter young man comes to work in the store, he will upset Keiko’s contented stasis—but will it be for the better?

That blurb! I’d like to know the amount of people it fooled into believing that this book is a quirky romance. I know it did me! It’s fine though, because it’s infinitely better than any romance could be.

Continue reading

Secrets for the Mad by Dodie Clark [YouTube is actually a wannabe writers detour]

a youtuber book

a youtuber book

I mean, I picked it up so blame me.

I believe in principle that YouTubers should not write memoirs and self-help books unless they’re an in-depth one on YouTube specifically. But that’s not how the world works is it? This world works on a if-it-cashes-in basis.

Continue reading

We were liars by E. Lockhart [so am I]

(So so so sorry for the big absence we do other stuff sometimes? You can leave a Howler below.)

What started out as an easy and interesting read turned into the last chapter of shock.

We were liars, is about what goes on behind the scenes in the house of the Sinclair family.

Particularly, Cady.

The story is about four cousins who get together every summer and hence call themselves the liars.

And then there’s an accident.

Continue reading

I Dare You #Booktag

I Dare you

 

We decided to do this book tag after the fabtastic @Paperfury did it over at her blog. Go check out her blog if you haven’t already!

1. WHAT BOOK HAS BEEN ON YOUR SHELVES THE LONGEST?

Raven: I had to look at my goodreads shelf for this and apparently Son of Sobek by Rick Riordan has been on my shelf since January 4, 2014…

Beez: *Denial*

Continue reading

The Reader Confession Tag

UNIVERSITY PRESS

Let’s be honest… we weren’t tagged to do this but we were desperate to talk about ourselves. Also, Holly said “YOU” at the end of her tags so excuse me but who are we to pass over an opportunity?

We were inspired to do this tag after we saw Holly, over @Nutfreenerd do it. Check her fabulous blog if you haven’t already!

And we really tried to find out who made this tag first but we couldn’t, so whoever made this tag… hey there.

Here come the questions:

Continue reading

200 followers and 80 posts later…

2017-04-30

Thank you all so much! We wouldn’t be here if it wasn’t for your undying support for all the crap we put up on this blog. Even when we disappeared for a month (Well we were in a place away from the internet…) you people still stuck with us. So thank you!

What in the even

This is Beez and I after we got the notification

Continue reading

A very late review of my 2016’s best

befunky-collage

Eileen was a great read. It was dark and isolating and a detailed portrait of a person but also a reflection. It was like a battle of the self, the anatomy of basic human feelings and thought processes with a dash of poisonous habits. It was brilliant.

The thing about jellyfish was a delight. It was little smiles and a warm heart and good wishes. It was the sweetest and it touched me and I’ll forever yell I loved that book from the rooftops. It also had the most beautiful science that reminded me of my love of science and made me sad that science is usually made boring and dry and theoretical and unloved.

Continue reading

Mini Book Reviews #1

Don’t want to spend a lot of time reading huge ass reviews for books? Welcome to my mini-reviews edition!

If you remember, I had done one a while ago but it was a Mini DNF review. This is my first mini-review of books I’ve read and scrutinized thoroughly *cue professional music*.

28498779Magic Bitter, Magic Sweet by Charlie N. Holmberg

Publication Date: June 28, 2016

Publisher: 47North

Targeted Audience: Young Adult/Adult

Genre: Fantasy/Magic

[Note: I received a free copy of this book from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. Also, this book is technically targeted towards adults since the MC is an adult but young adults can read it too.]

This is the kind of book I give a three star because I liked it… but I also didn’t like it.

Continue reading